Tag Archives: Salad

Broccoli Juice!?!

3 Jul

Broccoli Juice!?!

We don’t have that many fancy kitchen appliances, mainly because we can’t fit anything more into our small kitchen. One that we do have and that we really use is our juice machine. It doesn’t seem to matter what we put into it, everything that comes out tastes divine. Therefore we decided to start pushing its limits: Broccoli is a great vegetable in food, but how can we make a good juice out of it?
We added orange, apple, kiwi and ginger and it actually wasn’t half bad. And if you think of all it contains it’s really a bomb; Broccoli is rich in iron, and for absorbing iron into your body you need vitamin C, which you get from the kiwi and orange. Ginger is good for a million different reasons. Luise always adds linseed or almond oil as well because it’s good for the skin and the stomach (but I like it better without …).

Ingredients broccoli juice

Broccoli Juice
1 glass

1 orange
1 apple
1 kiwi
1 handful of broccoli
2 cm fresh ginger

2 tbsp linseed oil
ice cubes

Put all the ingredients in a juice machine, pour it in a glass, add oil and ice cubes and stir. Enjoy with fresh mint leaves!

www.bettiblue.com

Portion Control tips:

18 Jan

Do you ever feel obligated to finish everything on your plate, even if you’re not hungry? Formed with good intentions, this concept can cause more harm than good in this time of absurd portions.  Half of us eat everything on their plates, regardless of size. Problem is, a typical dinner plate holds three serving of spaghetti, not just one. Want to cut calories?  A better strategy is to find ways to put less on your plate to begin with.

One of the most important steps in weight loss (and keeping it off) begins in the kitchen or eating out places.  The easiest way is to greatly reduce the portion size of meals.


Here are a few tips for controlling your portion sizes. All these options can help you to safe weight and the most important is control the weight.

* Use smaller plates and bowls. There’s a proven link between the perceived size of food and appetite.

* Serve dinner by the plate, rather than family style (serving dishes on the table), you’ll be less tempted to load up on second servings if they’re not right in front of you.

* Use blended food.

* Order an appetizer as an entree. Remember to stay away from fried foods though.

* Order from the lunch menu at dinnertime.

*Leftovers are okay. Ask the server to wrap up half your meal before bringing it out.

* Order smaller sizes such as a half-order of pasta or a “petite” cut of meat. Even so, portions may still be hefty. It’s not unusual for a “smaller” portion of meat to be an 8-ounce serving.

* Pay attention to what you’re eating. You’ll eat more if you’re mindlessly grazing or staring at the TV.

* If you like to snack while watching TV, measure out one serving of your snack – don’t take a whole bag of chips with you into your TV room.

* Learn to read food labels, but be careful. Serving sizes can be misleading (for example, a can of cola is technically two servings.)

* If you eat at a restaurant, ask for a container and take half of your meal home, or split your meal with your dining partner.

* If you like to snack while watching TV, measure out one serving of your snack – don’t take a whole bag of chips with you into your TV room.

* Eat low-calorie foods first. Start your meal with a clear soup or green salad to ease your hunger a bit so that you aren’t as likely to over eat.

As you cut down portions, you may feel a little hungry at first. To offset this temporary hunger without eating more:

* Drink more water

* Eat fiber-loaded foods- add extra servings of nutrient-dense vegetables like carrots, green beans and celery. While one-half cup of rice or pasta has about 100 calories, one-half cup of green beans has only 14 calories.

* Eat slowly, put the fork down between bites

Portions Verses Servings

Although many people use these words interchangeably, portion and serving are not always the same. A portion is any amount of a certain food you choose to put on your plate, while a serving is a recommended amount of food based on health and nutrition guides.

To lose weight on a regular basis you need to eat foods we call ‘slimming sensations’. These foods are low in processed sugar and fat and provide your body with the necessary nutrients. As you continue to lose weight, feel confident enough to include an occasional (small) slice of your favorite cake or share dessert with a friend. Your weight loss will continue even with a small portion of something you love.

Pre Workout Meals

11 Dec

Maintaining your strength and energy level is essential when training or competing on a highly intense level. The food you eat is a big factor on how you perform. During exercise athletes primarily rely on pre-existing glycogen stores and fat stores. If your pre-workout meal is eaten at the proper time then you will be assured that your glycogen stores are plenty full and this will optimize performance. Liquid meals can also be an advantage by digesting more rapidly than solid foods as well as provide hydration. Liquid meals can be eaten closer to workouts because they are emptied from the stomach quickly.  Pre-workout snacks within 1 hour of practice can be more beneficial to athletes that exercise longer than 60 minutes.  It is important to choose primarily carbohydrates before a workout because they are quickly digested, and readily available for fuel.  Drink adequate amounts of fluid (avoid dairy). The American College of Sports Medicine recommends 17 ounces of fluid two hours before exercise, as well as enough fluid during exercise to replace the water lost through perspiration. A rule of thumb is to drink enough water to urinate clear prior to a workout. For the first hour of aerobic exercise use water only. Use electro-light replacement drinks after the first hour of exercising. Use caution with foods that have a high sugar content (such as soft drinks and candy). Since athletes’ metabolism is higher than the average person they may experience a drop in blood sugar following consumption, which can result in light-headedness or fatigue and loss in performance. Here are some guidelines for when to fuel prior to a competition or event: Hours Before Event Meal Type Calories 3-5 hours Large meal 300-500 2-3 hours Small meal 200-300 1-2 hours Liquid meal 100-200 .5-1 hour Snack 50-100. With intense exercise your body shifts 80 percent of its blood supply to the muscles in use. This shift deprives the stomach of the blood needed to digest food. This slows digestion and may cause an uncomfortable feeling in the stomach because of undigested food that is still present. A meal that is high in calories will take longer to digest than a lighter snack. It is suggested a three to four hour delay between high calorie meals and intense exercise.

Some examples of meals and snacks are listed below:

Pre Workout Meals


BREAKFAST

Meal 1

1 1 hardboiled egg 1 slice whole grain toast 1 tsp butter 1 tbsp honey or jam 1 fruit 1 8 oz glass water

Meal  2

1 cup low fat yogurt 1 slice whole grain bread 1 tbsp honey or jam 1 cup fruit 1 8 oz glass water

Meal 3

1 Cup Oatmeal cooked in water 1 cup cottage cheese 1 fruit 1 8 oz glass water

LUNCH

Meal 1

Turkey Sandwich 4 oz turkey breast sliced 2 slices whole wheat bread 2 tsp mayonnaise 1/2 sliced tomato shredded lettuce 1 cup milk 1 8 oz glass water

Meal 2

1 cup canned split pea soup 5 wheat thin crackers 2 Cups Tossed Green Salad 2 Cups shredded Iceberg lettuce 1/2 Cup diced tomato 1/2 Cup diced cucumber 2 Tbsp Oil/Vinegar Dressing 1 8 oz glass water

Meal 3

Melon Salad 1 cup melon chunks 1/2 cup Strawberries 1/2 cup grapes 1 Tbsp Sunflower Seeds 1 Cup Low Fat Cottage Cheese 1 8 oz glass water

DINNER

Meal 1

Cajun Snapper 1/2 cup rice 1 cup broccoli (steamed) 1 tbsp olive oil & lemon marinade 1 8 oz glass water

Meal 2

Garlic Ginger Chicken 1 cup pasta 1 green salad tossed 1 tbsp oil/vinegar dressing 1 8 oz glass water

Meal 3

Grilled Tuna 1 Peach 1 8 oz glass water

SNACKS

Snack 1

1 scoop whey protein powder with 8 oz water 1/2 toasted bagel with Jam

Snack 2

1 hard boiled egg 1 cup strawberries

Snack 3

4 oz artificial crab meat or seafood sticks 1 apple

%d bloggers like this: